Mooring in the forbidden islands: an opportunity for post-Covid revitalization

THE PERFECT GIFT!

Give or treat yourself to a subscription to Boats in Motion print + digital and for only 39 euros a year you get the magazine at home plus read it on your PC, smartphone and tablet. With a sea of advantages.

Good news. Gallinara, the only island in western Liguria with Bergeggi, will not become a luxury resort for a select few. The Mibact (Ministry of Cultural Heritage and Activities and Tourism) purchased it, exercising its right of first refusal shortly before it became the property of Russian oligarch Alexandr Boguslayev, who planned to turn it into a paradise for the rich.

The Mibact plans to make it available to the public. The hope is that this is nothing more than the first step toward a new management of Italy’s marine and protected areas, a unique heritage throughout the Mediterranean mostly forbidden to boaters who would like to moor and visit these paradise islands. Environmentally friendly, of course.

The problem is this, protected areas containing such gems as Montecristo, Pianosa, Gorgona (but also of much of Giannutri, Capriaia just to stay in Tuscany) are off-limits. Why? There is no ministry to direct and coordinate the management of protected areas in a uniform way.

Chaos reigns: regions, state bodies, even prison guards rule. Everyone has his or her own personal goals of position rent. No one thinks about making them usable on land and especially at sea, opening them up to recreation, a type of tourism that certainly does not go to the expense of the local ecosystem.

One only has to see the Spanish example of Cabrera in the small island marine reserve of the Balearic Islands and the parks of Corsica and Southern France to realize that it is possible to organize environmentally sustainable nautical tourism. The Mibact would surely be the right reference to radically rethink it by finally opening it up to those who want, with their own boats, to visit and moor in these havens that are still, for the most part, inaccessible.

Nautical tourism, in Italy, is an untapped asset that could become one of the elements of post-pandemic revitalization. All it takes is for someone (we repeat: the Mibact) to take the reins, creating a coordinated plan that takes into account reality and not privilege.

 

DON’T MISS THE BEST ARTICLES!

To stay up-to-date on all the boating news, selected by our editorial staff, sign up for the Motor Boats newsletter! Just click the link below, accept the Privacy Policy, and click the “Subscribe Me” button. You will then receive the best powerboat news on your email, twice a week! It’s free and you can unsubscribe at any time, no obligation! CLICK HERE.

Share:

Facebook
Twitter
WhatsApp

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Are you already a subscriber?

Sign up for our Newsletter

Join the Sailing Newspaper Club

Powerboats, its stories, from small open to motoryachts. Sign up now for our free newsletter and receive the best news selected by the editorial staff each week. Enter your email below, agree to the Privacy Policy and click the “sign me up” button.

Once you click on the button below check your mailbox

Privacy*


Highlights

You may also be interested in.

Maserati Tridente, questo è il primo motoscafo della Maserati

Tridente, this is the new speedboat according to Maserati

Maserati launches into the world of powerboats with Maserati Tridente, the Modenese company’s first 100% electric powerboat. It will be an electric-powered 10-meter developed in collaboration with Vita Power. The promised top speed? 40 knots and DC charging capability in